Five Frugal Things

by Katy on February 14, 2019 · 117 comments

  1. I sold a vintage Griswold popover pan on eBay, as well as a pair of Nike sample shoes. (Nike is a local company for us Oregonians, so speciality items hit the thrift shops pretty frequently.) I also renewed a couple of Facebook Marketplace listings, although I doubt that they’ll sell anytime soon as they’re warm weather items. (A bike, a lawn mower and bike rack.) I worked a 12-hour hospital shift and have two more scheduled this week, although one is just a mandatory on-call shift.

    I was able to transfer a couple thousand dollars into my son’s college account, as the next payment is due at the beginning of April, which is just around the corner. March is a five-paycheck month, as my husband and I get paid on alternate Fridays. I cherish these months.

  2. I picked up a few more items to sell on eBay, including some Pyrex ware, a vintage handmade cribbage board, a Furby and a set of educational anatomy flash cards. I’m trying to only sell things I can make at least $20 from. Plus I only want to spend a couple of bucks on anything that I buy for resale. Not smart to spend $30 to make $50 or $2 to make $8.

  3. I arranged for a review copy of Gretchen Rubin’s latest book, as well as an extra for a blog giveaway. It’s called Outer Order, Inner Calm, and I’m more than a little excited to dive into it, as Gretchen’s writing is always in depth yet focused and concise. I know the book will provide both inspiration and researched backed data. A lethal combination!

  4. I got a free 6-pack of McNuggets as our NBA team scored over 100 points, I brought leftover beef stew to work even though SOMEONE HAD PICKED OUT ALL THE BEEF CHUNKS, I took my son to Dollar Tree to pick up notebooks and coconut oil and didn’t succumb to any impulse purchases, (a Herculean feat!) I’m reading a library copy of Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products by Nir Eyal, I sent out all my eBay items with second-hand packaging materials, I listened to the How to Money podcast while driving and I continue to wear thrifted clothing, sleep on thrifted sheets and sit on thrifted furniture.

  5. I didn’t buy a Lear Jet or a vulgar gold-plated apartment in the sky.

Now your turn. What frugal things have you been up to?

Katy Wolk-Stanley    

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

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{ 117 comments }

The following is a reprint of a previously published post. Enjoy!

My 15-year-old son and I just had a very interesting experience volunteering for his annual school auction. As a parent of a two high schoolers, I was surprised at how few people I recognized at a school event for a program my kids have been attending for 13 long years. (I guess I shouldn’t have been surprised, as it is the elementary school parents who make up the majority of involved parents.) We were at the event facility from 5 P.M. until 11 P.M. on Friday, and spent a good three hours of that time working as a busboy. (The public school support organization kept expenses down by not hiring wait staff.) We carried plates, scraped leftover food into the garbage and worked up a sweat in the process.

As much as I didn’t know the current cohort of grade school parents, they also didn’t know me. I think a lot of them assumed I was a simple cater-waiter. I would estimate that a quarter of them were very dismissive to my statement of “If you’re done with your plate, I can take it away” which I found to be very telling. They would barely respond to me, and were certainly not helpful in maybe grabbing their neighbor’s empty plate to lend a hand. By comparison, others would reach for plates that were out of my reach and then thank me.

I’ve heard that you can tell a lot about a person from how they treat waiters.

It got me thinking about how for a supposedly egalitarian society, The United States very much has societal levels that that are both glaring and subtle. The 99% vs. 1% has received a lot of attention over the past few years, but that 99% is split into endless categories. Race, education level, attractiveness and nationality all affect how we are perceived in this world. And as a white, generally attractive and well educated woman, it’s not part of my daily thinking.

Don’t get me wrong, as I wasn’t upset or angry with the experience. I just considered it to be an interesting point to ponder.

As an experienced labor and delivery nurse, I am used to being a source of important information, with people hanging on my every word. And as a successful blogger, I am used to people respecting and admiring what I do. (As the parent to two teenage boys, I am used to being mocked and ignored, but I take that with a grain of salt.) I’m not used to people barely acknowledging my presence.

Like the show Undercover Boss, where corporate CEO’s take on lowly roles within their own company to get a real sense of how their organizations are actually functioning. Let’s just call it “Undercover Katy.”

How is this related to non-consumerism?

I am privileged.

No I’m not wealthy, but I was raised in a middle class home where I always knew I would go to college. I live in a safe and community oriented neighborhood where I can walk to two excellent grocery stores, and I can trust that my stable neighbors can be trusted. Yes, we had to buy a disgusting fixer-upper to make this happen, but we did. And I never give a second thought to the reliability of my transportation.

And I usually take that for granted.

My non-consumerism relies heavily on the community I live in. If I were in more of a low income area, my food shopping options would likely be limited, and our safety would not be a given. I have opportunities that many other Americans do not.

I’ve run three food stamp challenges over the past few years, and there are always a few readers who respond with judgment about how real food stamp recipients should be living their lives. They choose to ignore how a person’s inherent privilege gives them advantages that we’re often not even aware of.

So thank you, fellow parents for reminding me to appreciate the privilege that makes my daily life both easy and safe.

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

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{ 23 comments }

Five Frugal Things

by Katy on February 11, 2019 · 78 comments

  1. My friend Lise texted asking if I had afternoon plans, as her husband accidentally double booked himself and wasn’t able to use his ticket to see a theatrical production of Sense and Sensibility. Umm . . . yes! Because Jane Austen + live theater + free are all things I will 103% agree to. Add the three together and giddiness ensues. The play was superb, both hilarious and poignant. And since it was the final production, the actors chewed up the scenery and threw in spontaneous ad libs that added to the hilarity. Perfection.

  2. I borrowed a productivity hack from Gretchen Rubin and set the stop watch on my phone for one of her power hours. Essentially to devote a single 60-minute period to completing the annoying tasks that normally don’t float to the top of one’s to-do list. And since I grew up taking dance classes, I add an extra layer to always be thinking two steps ahead, which eliminates the pause points between tasks. No “hmm . . . what should I do next?” which kills any momentum.

    So while I’m wiping down the front of the splattered kitchen cupboards, I know I’ll clean the cobwebs from the hanging light fixture in the entryway. But I also know that I’ll sweep the basement stairs. As I complete one task I add another step, so I always have two more things to do. Like chess, but for household drudgery.

    I was able to wipe down the kitchen cupboards, clean the entryway light, sweep the basement stairs, scoop the litter boxes, take out the recycling, put the cover back on the propane grill, wipe down the bathroom, start laundry, sweep the kitchen/dining room, cut forsythia for the dining room, tidy the entryway, (so many shoes!) vacuum the living room/spare bedroom, switch laundry and a couple other things that escape my mind. POWER HOUR!

  3. Portland had been forecasted to receive an entire week of snow. Of course, people panic shopped and cleared the grocery store shelves of bread, milk and hilariously, kale. I shop for the pantry, rather than specific meals, which means that I’m pretty much set for general food prep at all times. Granted, I’m walking distance from two grocery stores, but the panic was still an overreaction. Especially since we received an inch or so of snow which has since been melted by Portland’s ever present rain.

    I’m happy that my fridge isn’t stuffed with excessive amounts of wilting kale.

    You can read about “the pantry principal,” (which I stole from Amy Dacyczyn) in this nine-year-old blog post.

  4. I sold the top half of a Fiestaware butter dish, I put together a couple new eBay listings, I picked up a library copy of Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products by Nir Eyal, I invited my mother and step father over for a frugal yet delicious dinner, (hosting doesn’t have to be expensive) and I worked two 12-hour hospital shifts.

  5. I didn’t buy a Lear Jet or a vulgar gold-plated apartment in the sky.

Now your turn. What frugal things have you been up to?

Katy Wolk-Stanley    

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

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{ 78 comments }

Five Frugal Things

by Katy on February 5, 2019 · 134 comments

  1. I sold the last pair of my new-old-stock 99¢ Spanx pantyhose that I picked up from the Eugene Goodwill a few weeks ago. I also sold a new-with-tags Goodwill Disneyland mug. (Both through eBay.) I worked three 12-hour shifts at the hospital last week, which sort of makes up for taking two weeks off to visit my sister in New York. I feel like I was hit by a Mack truck, but it’ll be worth it when I get my next paycheck. Needless to say, (but I’ll say it anyway) I brought my own lunches and drank the free so-so coffee.

  2. I went out of my way to grocery shop at Winco, which has the cheapest prices in town. I then quickly stopped into Goodwill on my way home to peruse the supposed influx of KonMari-inspired donations and picked up a buttery soft Martha Stewart fleece robe for $4. I also popped into Dollar Tree to exchange a wavery pair of reading glasses and grabbed a few things including shampoo, conditioner, soap, toothpaste, knock-off Oxyclean, day old Orowheat bread and English muffins, pinto beans, olives and kosher salt. I bypassed the plastic impulse items and accepted the checker’s compliment on my $4.99 thrifted Queen Bee purse. We then had a short but satisfying conversation about all the great finds to be had at Goodwill.

  3. I arranged a grown-up-lady play date with my friend Lise. Did we drink mimosas and get mani-pedis? Nope! We walked to the library and then picked up a few items at New Seasons Market. (Their beets were huge!) She told me how she’d heard an interesting statistic about how social isolation has been found to be equivalent to smoking 15 cigarettes per day. I’m someone who values having time alone, but also need some regular social interaction. However, I’m happy to mostly have my play dates be a walk through the neighborhood or conversations with my co-workers. (Working at the same job for 24 years means that I have deep and honest relationships with the other labor and delivery nurses, even though we never socialize outside of work.) Having a limited budget for entertainment and socializing doesn’t mean that I sit at home without social capital.

  4. I’m donating two grocery bags of miscellaneous items to Goodwill this afternoon. Doing enormous Marie Kondo style decluttering is great at the beginning of the journey, but I’ve whittled down my belongings enough so that it’s usually just a few things here and there. Included are a pair of pajama pants that fit weird, (I chalk this up to my lumpy abdomen, not the pants) a ceramic vase leftover from when my mother received an Edible Arrangements bouquet a few years ago, a sealing machine that a friend gave me as part of a load of shipping supplies, an oddly sized Pyrex leftovers container that doesn’t fit in my cupboard and a fake flower boutonnière from my son’s high school graduation. I simply keep a grocery bag in my dining room for donations and toss things into it when I come across unwanted items. This little-bit-here-and-there method works great for me.

  5. I didn’t buy a Lear Jet or a vulgar gold-plated apartment in the sky.

Now your turn. What frugal things have you been up to?

Katy Wolk-Stanley    

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

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{ 134 comments }

Five Frugal Things

by Katy on January 27, 2019 · 86 comments

  1. I sold a thrifted mahjong set through Facebook Marketplace, which my husband simply set out for the buyer as I’m still visiting my sister in New York. I also sold two eBay items, (a vintage “Hamm’s” scarf and a set of playing cards) which I’ll ship once I’m back in Portland. I then wrote two paid articles, which’ll help to defray some of the lost income from not working at the hospital. In a nicely timed coincidence, my work bonus appeared on last week’s paycheck, which means that I was able to miss two weeks of work without any pay dips.

  2. I arranged lunch dates in Manhattan with a three different friends, yet kept it 100% on budget. How?

    I scheduled a date with my gorgeous and talented friend Greta. She works at one of the city’s universities, whose campus features a solidly acceptable on-site cafeteria. And since their employee dining hall looks out over the East River, we enjoyed a million dollar view to go with our $9 salads. The hidden bonus of not choosing a traditional restaurant was that there was no tip, as it really was a straight-up cafeteria. Plus, they give out free fancy chocolates with every lunch!

    I then planned a get together with my old friend David, who works for a Manhattan based Hospital. (Coincidently up the street from Greta.) He gave me the choice to either find a restaurant or to eat at the on-site cafeteria. (I think you can see where this is going!) Yup — cafeteria! Since I was paying cash, I even got to use David’s employee discount, which brought the price of my lunch down to a mere $6.50. Again, there was no tip to pay. My goal with these dates was not to dine at the city’s finest establishments, but to catch up with old friends and not keep them away from their work duties any longer than necessary.

     I lastly met up with my old blogging pal, Gretchen Rubin. She chose the restaurant Le Pain Quotidien, which is a national chain. Me being me, I researched whether they had an app that might offer freebies to new members. Ding-ding-ding! Not just a free coffee or dessert, but an actual free entrée! This lunch ended up being the cheapest of all my lunch dates, as my only billed item was a drip coffee.

  3. My sister has never ending papers to write as part of her graduate school program. However, it can be difficult to focus while in the apartment, so I convinced her to dedicate a couple hours of studying at the Mamaroneck public library. They have a beautiful reading room with long tables and a decidedly serene atmosphere. (Plus free parking on Sundays!) We both got some work done, although I did sneak out to grab us a huge Italian combo hero from Cosmo & Alex Pisano Bros, and costs just $7.50.

    The library houses a used book store in the basement, but also has a cart of free (free!) books. I was able to find a book which’ll do quite nicely as an airplane read for my return trip to Oregon. For free! Free. (Free!)

  4. I’ll be hitting up my sister’s grocery store in the morning to stock up on food for my trip home. Although the flight itself is just 6 hours, I’ll leave for the airport 5 hours in advance, (multiple public transportation cogs, plus a few hours early to satisfy any paranoia about arriving late for my flight.) In total, I’ll be 11-1/2 hours between my sister’s apartment and my own refrigerator house. I don’t want to get hungry and held hostage to airplane food, which is the worst combination of yucky and expensive.

  5. I didn’t buy a Lear Jet or a vulgar gold-plated apartment in the sky.

Now your turn. What frugal things have you been up to?

Katy Wolk-Stanley    

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

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{ 86 comments }

Cooking With Condiment Packets

by Katy on January 24, 2019 · 22 comments

This blog post first appeared over at ClarkHoward.com. Enjoy!

When keeping to a food budget it’s important to keep your recipes simple and classic. But no one wants to give up flavor in the name of financial responsibility. Guess what? You probably already have a stash of cheap-o recipe boosters — your random jumble of condiment packets! You know, all those takeout ketchup, soy sauce and hot sauce packets that usually just languish in the back of your fridge or pantry.

Luckily, there are many culinary dishes that lend themselves to the bit of this, bit of that style of cookery magic and will not only save you money, but turn out to be quite delicious.

Meatloaf

Whether you’re using your grandfather’s secret recipe as a guide or following the classic Betty Crocker version, meatloaf happily welcomes packets of ketchup, mustard, barbecue sauce, soy sauce or even the spiciness from a packet or two of Taco Bell hot sauce. You may never make it the same way twice, but you’re sure to create something special.

Deviled Eggs

Deviled eggs are another savory treat that easily accepts a bit of kitchen experimentation. Squeeze out your unopened packets of wasabi or simply go the tried and true route of mayonnaise and mustard. Either way, you’ll be the hit of your next potluck.

Marinades

You already know that marinating meat is the secret to adding flavor and moisture to an otherwise bland piece of meat. But there’s no reason to pay big bucks for bottled marinades, as creating your own is almost as easy as pouring milk over a bowl of cereal.

Marinades are usually just a combination of:

  • An acid such as lemon juice, vinegar or wine.

  • Oil.

  • Spices and flavor, which is where you get to flex your creative muscle!

Sure, you can follow a specific recipe for guidance, or simply refer to a marinade guide such as this one from The Splendid Table, but once you’ve figured out the general formula, you’ll be rifling through your condiment packets looking for jam, soy sauce, hot sauce, honey and hot pepper flakes.

Pesto

Pesto is traditionally made with fresh parmesan cheese, basil and pine nuts, but I’m simply too cheap to splurge on all these expensive ingredients. Instead, I’m a fan of this pesto recipe, which uses inexpensive greens such as kale. However, I’ve taken it one step further and incorporate tiny packets of parmesan cheese, which I hoard from delivered pizzas. (I’ll even scoop them up after work events.) It may take a large number of them, but they quickly pile up, especially if you’re attending events where multiple pizzas are being served.

Salad Dressing

Bottled salad dressing can be a real budget buster. Sure, you can pay as little as a buck from Dollar Tree, but making your own from scratch will end up tastier and likely even cheaper. I’m partial to this honey mustard salad dressing recipe, which uses standard ingredients to create a gourmet flavor. Best of all? It’s the perfect opportunity to take advantage of all those mustard condiment packets! Or you can try this vinaigrette recipe and use up your miscellaneous jam packets.

Use As-Is

All of this dietary experimentation might not be your style, in which case you can always save those condiments for packed lunches, picnics or camping, as their small size minimizes weight and doesn’t require refrigeration.

Final Thought:

Whether you’re squeezing a ketchup packet onto a home grilled hamburger or working it into a recipe, you’re saving money by using what you already own. Resist the urge to toss these culinary gems, and instead set them aside for a night of experimentation.

Your only limitation is your imagination.

{ 22 comments }

Five Frugal Things

by Katy on January 21, 2019 · 91 comments

  1. My sister splurged on an unlimited ride NYC Metrocard, and although I’d already bought my own $20 card, she’s letting me swipe hers for the day. (I’m meeting up with a friend in the city while my sister slogs through her grad school work.) This saved me $2.75 each direction, plus any other travel that I happened to do within the city limits.

  2. My niece and I drove back up to the Mamaroneck library yesterday to donate yet another load of books. Their policy is for one box/bag per day, but since my sister is desperately trying to declutter her apartment, her “one bag” was one of those enormous Ikea blue monstrosities. I was fully willing to abide by their rules, but they sighed and graciously accepted the entire lot. We also dropped a couple bins of stuff at her local church thrift shop, and will likely donate a huge bag of yarn later this evening. Slowly but surely, we’re transforming her Boxhenge in The Bronx cluttered apartment into a calm and welcoming space.

    Decluttering is a time consuming and emotionally exhausting task in the best of circumstances. Add in an intensive graduate school program and it’s a freaking OIympic event.

  3. I found two one dollar bills on the floor of a bodega, and since no one in the store claimed it as their own, I’ll be adding it to my found Found Change Challenge for 2019. I’ve also been picking up random pennies, nickels and dimes throughout my stay.

  4. My sister is in full get rid of it mode, which means I can shop for free from her unwanted items. I’m normally loathe to take on others’ excess, but was happy to accept a free pair of Birkenstocks that had always been too big for her. And since they’d never fit right, they’re in like-new condition. The only downside is these they’re the exact style that my father wears 10-1/2 months out of the year. I guess I’m transforming into an aging hippie professor dude after all.

  5. I didn’t buy a Lear Jet or a vulgar gold-plated apartment in the sky.

Now your turn. What frugal things have you been up to?

Katy Wolk-Stanley    

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

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{ 91 comments }

Five Frugal Things

by Katy on January 17, 2019 · 89 comments

  1. I’m in New York for a couple of weeks to visit with my sister. Amazingly I was able to score a round trip ticket for just $186 as I had a $50 voucher leftover from helping with a passenger’s on a previous flight. I flew into Newark and then took New Jersey Railroad into Penn Station for a mere $13, which was extremely straightforward. From there I met up with my sister, and together took the subway to her apartment in The Bronx. Navigating an unfamiliar public transportation system can seem intimidating, but is usually easier than you think. New York City’s transit system has great signage to direct even the most befuddled tourist.

    I’m starting to arrange lunch and coffee dates with NYC based friends, which will be fun. I have writing projects to attend to, (as well as supporting my sister) but that doesn’t mean I can’t sneak in some mild fun and shenanigans.

    Want information on visiting New York City on a budget? Click HERE to read how I’m enjoy the city without breaking the bank.

  2. One thing I’m doing while in New York is helping my sister winnow down her belongings. However, unlike Portland, with its multiple easily accessible Goodwill donation stops, (that take everything from furniture to toys, books to electronics) things are not so easy here. We filled up the back of her station wagon and drove north of the city to her trusty New Rochelle Goodwill only to learn that they no longer accept books, which was easily 3/4 of her donations! (Due to living in The Bronx, it’s often easier to go north of city rather than into mayhem of New York City.) No worries though, as we knew that the Mamaroneck library features a used book store. Until we learned that they only accept a single box of books per day. Even the Little Free Library was so crammed with books as to be a no go.

    This story does not have a nice tidy end, as the back of my sister’s car continues to be filled with books. I guess we’ll just head back to the Mamaroneck library tomorrow. And the next day. And probably the day after that as well.

    Whattaya think? After effects of the current KonMari fever sweeping the nation?

  3. I met up for lunch with my friend Greta today, but instead of heading out to a restaurant, we dined at the Rockefeller University cafeteria where she works. Not only was the price reasonable, but there was no tip to include, which saved us both a couple of bucks.

    After all, what am I a Rockefeller? <—- I am unable to resist a bad good pun!

    New York is brisk and windy, and it’s a challenge to stay warm while out and about. However, downloading the Pret A Manger app onto my phone rewarded me with a free coffee drink of my choice. Warm in my hands, warm in my belly. Plus it’s free? The cold weather trifecta!

  4. I found one nickel and two pennies while running errands with my sister this evening, we stopped into Goodwill and I didn’t buy anything, I sold a vintage Hamm’s Beer knit scarf on eBay, my sister gave me a free pass to The American Museum of Natural History and then I found a dime on the ground.

  5. I didn’t buy a Lear Jet or a vulgar gold-plated apartment in the sky.

Now your turn. What frugal things have you been up to?

Katy Wolk-Stanley    

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

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{ 89 comments }

Five Frugal Things

by Katy on January 14, 2019 · 72 comments

  1. I sold a few items including a landscape painting, some midcentury wall hangings and two brand new sets of Spanx pantyhose. The latter sale was an odd one, but I took a chance on picking up three pairs at Goodwill, as they were priced for 99¢ apiece despite the original Nordstrom price tag of $19.99. I still have one more pair for sale, and expect them to sell quickly as the first two sold overnight.

  2. I’m flying to New York City and took the time to pack a ham sandwich, cheese, eggs and tangerines. The trip only takes five hours, but once you add in the Portland airport time plus transportation from the NY airport to my sister’s apartment, my food needs to cover breakfast, lunch as well as the multiple snacks that I normally mindlessly cram into my mouth enjoy throughout the day. I also packed a small box of chocolates for the flight attendants as a thank you gift, although I should have probably brought some for the poor TSA agents who are pointlessly working without pay.

  3. I’m arranging to do eight hours of paid education hours through my hospital. I earned this perk by working a certain number of hours in 2018, and can make sure to get these hours onto the next paycheck that would otherwise be empty due to my traveling.

  4. I created a Frankenbox out of used packaging materials to mail out the midcentury wall hangings, my husband and I continue to eat our way through the enormous free-from-work ham and I scored a used pair of jeans that are my favorite brand/my size. I recently discovered that they’re an expensive brand, (think $100+) which I hadn’t realized as I’d bought them at the pay-by-the-pound Goodwill. I’m extremely excited.

  5. I didn’t buy a Lear Jet or a vulgar gold-plated apartment in the sky.

Now your turn. What frugal things have you been up to?

Katy Wolk-Stanley    

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Twitter.
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{ 72 comments }

Five Frugal Things

by Katy on January 8, 2019 · 106 comments

  1. My husband and I switched cell phone providers, which came with two $300 debit cards as a rebate. The paperwork specified that they wouldn’t work for cash back. However, I’ve never been one to accept rules, so I tested it out and discovered that they did indeed work for cash back. I’m now in the process of draining them of value so that I put the money into the credit union, where they can be used for bills and properly tracked.

  2. I receive a gift certificate for a “free turkey or ham” from my employer each holiday season. I’ve switched back and forth between the two, but mostly get the hams since they’re pre-cooked and the thought of preparing a turkey meal so soon after Thanksgiving is overwhelming. I took my voucher into the grocery store, but since it was right at the expiration date, they didn’t have any hams which met the strict criteria of the small print. However, a quick conversation with the butcher confirmed that they’d still honor the coupon, which meant I was able to get a $42 11-pound ham for free.

    I’m not a big fan of ham eaten as is, (the texture is so . . . bouncy) but like it just fine as an ingredient in soups, which means my family will be enjoying a lot of ham-and-bean soups this month. Right now? Split pea soup. Starting tomorrow? White bean soup. Pretty soon? Chopped and frozen for future meals.

  3. I sold a Baby Bjorn carrier and a breastfeeding pillow through Facebook Marketplace, as well as a hodgepodge of different items through eBay. This includes a Calico Critter car, vintage floppy discs, two Starbucks mugs and a flannel duvet cover that my son had deemed to be “too scratchy.”

  4. I packed my work lunches, I arranged to come into the hospital to complete some online education, (thus ensuring I’d be paid for my time) I brought a couple bags of miscellaneous stuff into a local consignment store that I’d pulled from a shelf of “free stuff” outside an antique shop, I found a handful of change under my credit union’s coin counting machine, I took my daughter to a free resume assistance clinic at the library, I discovered that the library has a WordPress expert, and put in a request to meet with them for some desperately needed blogging assistance, (so many glitchy issues!) and I took up my neighbor’s offer of some free boxes and packing supplies from her basement.

  5. I didn’t buy a Lear Jet or a vulgar gold-plated apartment in the sky.

Now your turn. What frugal things have you been up to?

Katy Wolk-Stanley    

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

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