This post first appeared over at ClarkHoward.com.

I’m a huge fan of Trader Joe’s. I’m addicted to their hummus, and rely on many of their house brand products such as their 100% recycled content toilet paper, their eco-friendly dishwasher detergent and I always keep a bag of their Mandarin orange chicken in the freezer to stave off expensive takeout on busy nights. However, I feel like I need to don blinders whenever I enter the store, as Trader Joe’s is stocked to the gills with impulse purchases that are sure to derail my carefully crafted budget.

I stopped by my local Trader Joe’s last week and filled two grocery bags for a mere $20.25. I was amazed at the low price and joked to the clerk that it must be a record. His reply was that “it was because you didn’t buy any booze, nuts or vitamins.” This got me thinking, what are the Trader Joe’s products that cause a bag of groceries to skyrocket from $15 to $70?

I’m the first to defend that Trader Joe’s has some great deals. Their dried pasta is always 99¢, their canned marinara sauce is $1.99, and you can’t beat their Three Buck Chuck. However, Trader Joe’s is a skilled seductress when it comes to tempting you with their tasty nibbles. Check out following list, and maybe you’ll be able to leave the store while still making your student loan payments.

Wine:

The Trader Joe’s/Charles Shaw brand wine, (A.K.A. “Three Buck Chuck”) is a terrific bargain, but only if you’re not using the low price as a rationalization to buy more wine than you’d normally stock up on. One or two bottles are a great deal, buy it by the case and you’ve suddenly spent a fair amount of money.

Vitamins and supplements:

Vitamins can quickly add to your grocery bill, especially when you consider that current research on daily multi-vitamins shows that there’s “no proof of benefit,”  as well as “evidence of possible harm from high doses of certain vitamin supplements.”  Eat your greens and leave the multi-vitamins on the shelf.

Nuts:

Although the price per pound on the wide variety of Trader Joe’s nuts is a comparatively good value, mindless tossing of bags into your cute red cart is sure to bring your total to a surprisingly high amount.

Cookies, cookies, cookies:

Those clear plastic tubs are almost more famous than their delicious contents. Whether you’re buying the popular $1.99 “Cat Cookies” or $4.99 “Chocolatey Coated Chocolate Chip Dunkers,” just make sure these impulse purchases are actually on your shopping list. Add in that there’s no “pause point” in the packaging, and it might be a better idea to take a deep breath and move along.

Nut butters:

I ran a non-scientific poll of my co-workers asking which Trader Joe’s items have a tendency to derail their food budgets, and “nut butters” was a surprising answer. Choose both the crunchy and creamy almond butter, and you just added $14 to your total.

I stood in front of the energy bar section for a few minutes and quickly observed that shoppers grab these items by the handful. Considering that many energy bars have more sugar than a Snickers bar, indulging in these items are sure to weigh down more than just your grocery bill.

Flowers:

Walk into any Trader Joe’s and you’ll be greeted by a cheerful wall of mixed flowers. And since even the most expensive bouquets are just $9.99, it may seem like a benign choice to grab a bouquet. But it’s exactly this type of impulse purchase that makes Trader Joe’s a dangerous place for your credit union balance.

Candy:

A traditional grocery store will always feature shelves of tempting candy to derail your best efforts at self control. Of course, those candy bars will only set you back around 75¢. However, Trader Joe’s isn’t selling Snickers bars, which means that you’ll spend $2 for that end of shopping reward for yourself the kids.

There’s a reason why Trader Joe’s are so popular, as their stores offer great deals on unique and quality items. However, remove all the impulse items from their stores, and you’d quickly develop an powerful echo. I’m not suggesting that you never treat yourself to a bottle of wine, a bouquet of flowers or an after dinner treat. Just make sure you’re doing so with thoughtfulness and an awareness of how $2 here and $7 here can add up to a $70 bag of groceries.

Here’s how much extra you would have spent had you bought all the impulse items from this article:

  • 1 bottle of wine — $2.99
  • 1 bottle of multi-vitamins — $11.99
  • 1 pound of pistachios — $6.99
  • 1 tub of cookies — $4.99
  • 1 jar of almond butter — $6.99
  • 5 energy bars — $7.45
  • 1 medium flower bouquet — $5.99
  • 1 Ritter Sport chocolate bar — $1.99

Total — $52.37

And you’d still have nothing for dinner.

{ 41 comments }

Five Frugal Things

by Katy on March 29, 2017 · 100 comments

  1. My younger son has oral surgery today, which means that his pre-op consultation was yesterday. I’m still upset from when my older son went through the same thing a year-and-a-half ago. Not because he had any medical complications, but because our insurance refused to pay for the panoramic X-ray, which left us holding the bag for an extra $535. (They’ll only pay for this level of X-ray every two years.) I preemptively called up my son’s dentist and had them email any recent X-rays to the oral surgeon, including a panoramic one from last spring. The assistant tried to steer my son towards the X-ray room, but I asked her to wait until the surgeon had a chance to review the recent one. The oral surgeon was perfectly happy with the one-year-old X-ray, and I saved $535. BAM!
  2. The surgeon gave us a prescription for multiple medications, including pain meds and anti-nausea pills. However, we still have these leftover from when this son had surgery last summer. More money saved!
  3. My husband belongs to the Next Door group for our neighborhood and saw that some people were getting rid of a mostly decent propane grill. The two of us walked to their house and eagerly dragged it home. It had some surface rust, but it cleaned up in a jiffy. We’ll probably have to replace a few minor rusted out pieces, but it’s a Kenmore, so that should be no problem. The best part is that it has a intact waterproof cover, so we should be able to protect it from here on out.
  4. I signed up for the next four week schedule of hospital shifts. Even though it meant running half my errands, hovering over the computer until exactly 5 P.M., and then heading out to run the second half of my errands. This makes it possible to get enough work, rather than having to scramble for shifts.
  5. I didn’t buy a Lear Jet or a vulgar gold plated Квартира в небе.

Now your turn. What frugal things have you been up to?

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

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{ 100 comments }

Goodwill, Badwill, Questionable-will

by Katy on March 28, 2017 · 37 comments

Goodwill may have a mission to help those with barriers to employment, but to me they’re a study in what people declutter from their homes. An anthropologic study of sorts. For example:

Pointless souvenirs. The Netherlands have somehow convinced their tourists of the necessity to purchase decorative clogs, clogs and more clogs. Large and small, wooden and ceramic, singles and pairs. I call this Dutch Tulip Fever. Bonus points for the windmill imagery.

Targeted savings banks. Whether they’re extremely specific . . . .

Or frustratingly vague.

There’s always cute vintage stuff that’s sure to get snapped up.

Even though they can be marked by the names of those long forgotten.

Thrift stores consistently abound with ill advised craft projects.

But my favorites are always going to be the bafflingly bizarre. Like these Birkenstocks, for which a basketball heroically gave its life. So bright! So pebbly! No surprisingly . . . unworn.

I actually began a speech which began, “Gather around people, as I present to you the ugliest pair of shoes ever created!”

Makes me wish that my family had a tradition of white elephant parties . . .

Oh Goodwill, your wonders never cease to amaze!

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

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Five Frugal Things

by Katy on March 24, 2017 · 132 comments

  1. I drove down to pick my son up from college to bring him home for spring break. I’d assumed that he’d have extra “points” on his meal plan, and that he’d be able to swipe me into the dining hall. He didn’t. Instead we stopped about halfway through the 2-1/2 hour drive home to get 7-layer burritos at Taco Bell. Not free, but inexpensive at $2.59, and since I already had water in the car, I didn’t need to buy anything else.
  2. I turned in multiple Clark Howard articles over the past week in an I-can-see-the-finish-line effort to pile up as much money as possible for the April 1st tuition/room/board payments. I’m taking a week off from work to hang out with the kids, but that’ll be reflected in the paycheck that comes after the tuition deadline. I hardly get to see my older son during the school year, and he’s more important than my credit union balance.
  3. I stopped at Costco on my way down to pick my son up, as their gas is always around 20¢/gallon cheaper than surrounding gas stations. There was a bit of a line, but I used that as an opportunity to call my sister to perform the entire Math of Love Triangles song from Crazy Ex-Girlfriend. Because yes, I’d spent the previous evening playing the video over and over until I’d memorized the lyrics. Luckily, my husband works night shifts . . . .
  4. I worked yesterday and brought my own lunch, drank the free crappy coffee and had my annual evaluation with my boss. All is well, and I’ve jumped through all the hoops to continue work as a labor and delivery nurse for yet another year.
  5. I didn’t buy a Lear Jet or a vulgar gold-plated apartment in the sky.

Now your turn. What frugal things have you been up to?

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

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{ 132 comments }

This article first appeared over at ClarkHoward.com.

Are you tired on clicking articles that promise you the “ten best frugal tips!” but are disappointingly just the same tired suggestions to “skip that morning latte” or “pack your work lunch?” Yeah, me too. I crave outside the box frugal ideas when I read an article. I want to know what the cheapest of the cheap are doing to save money! I may not employ very single one of their ideas, but I can certainly find inspiration within their creative and dedicated frugality.

Linda: We’ve had a drought here in California for the last 5 years. I always catch the clean shower water while I wait for the water to heat up, and then I use it for my vegetable garden. And if I take a bath, I scoop that water out bucket by bucket to water my non-edible plants and flowers.

Lesley: I ate the same two meals for lunch and dinner pretty much every day for three years while in college: lentil-vegetable chili with rice, or rice with pintos and salsa. I still eat both of those things, but not quite so much.

Phyllis: I painted a nasty old toilet seat. I already had paint and the toilet seat, so no cost!

Daena: I use white vinegar and/or baking soda to clean everything – except windows, I have some special cloth that does that with only water – but I never spend money on cleaning supplies.

Tammi: I get souvenirs ahead of time before we go to a theme park like Disney, by asking friends and family if they have items they no longer get want or need. This way my son can get “stuff” at the park and we don’t spend extra money.

Adela: About ten years ago, after my divorce, I lived without living room furniture for about a year and was quite alright with it; then my friend decided to put a dent in my spartan ways by gifting me the desk and bookshelves from his first time in college. They’re now going on 30 years, and have survived a few moves. I still have them with no plans to replace.

Kim: I know they say not to grocery shop when you’re hungry, but sometimes I luck into stores that are sampling and I end up with a small meal.

Kristi: I cut into my hygiene items such as toothpaste, lotion, and shampoo and conditioner and use every last drop.

Lisa: I dumpster dived for my couch, chair, and table. I’ve also used Freecycle.org to get a toilet, shower and sink. I get a lot of hand me downs from friends and family for myself and for my kids. We also have a small group where we trade for things we need for things we no longer need.

Mary: I picked up a plastic travel mug off the road, because Shipley’s Donuts will refill them for 50 cents a cup.

CJ: We collected rainwater for using in the greenhouse, (which was made out of scrounged materials) for the garden, to fill the waterfowl pools, water all the farm animals, truck washing and flushing. In a pinch I’ve also used it in the washing machine.

MJ: I reuse baking paper, (parchment) wash out ziplock bags and use powdered milk for all my baking. We grow all our own herbs and some of our own veggies and fruit.

David: I picked up a free desk left on the side of the road while between jobs on a night shift.

Kristy: I once found a dumpster full of bread and bagels behind a bakery. It was winter, so all of it was frozen in clean bags. I took those bags home and ate bread forever. Lol.

Sandy: All of our furniture and kitchen supplies are from deceased grandparents and garage sales. Most of my clothing and jewelry come from garage sales. My produce comes from gardening and foraging, which I then freeze for winter.

Lynn: When we were kids our town had an annual “large stuff/household items” trash pick-up. People would put their stuff out at the curb, and we kids would ride our bikes around the neighborhood and freely and unabashedly scavenge. And – adults did it too, just not in their own neighborhoods!

Korina: We live in a historic art deco house (115 years old now) and when my dad sees another such house being renovated/demolished in our town, he goes dumpster diving. Saved amazing wooden doors, metal locks, furniture . . . repaired a lot of it and used it here.

Kris: I’d have to thank a college roommate for this story. My roommates and I were having a tough time at a school without a cafeteria and we couldn’t find jobs. The neighbors below were kicked out of the dorm and the stuff they left was bagged and thrown out. We went in while the cleaning crew wasn’t there and took all their nasty, dirty dishes from the sink, refrigerator, and counter tops (the cupboards were bare.) We soaked, scrubbed, bleached, washed the dishes, pots and pans, silverware, etc. We finally had something to cook and eat with!

Julie: We don’t have a heating system in our home other than a wood burning stove. We’re in Pennsylvania and spent $0 on wood this year. This is because we had some leftover from last year, as well as a few dead trees in our property that my husband cut up.

Alexa: At one point we cancelled the phone/internet/tv subscription and just used our pay as you go track phones ($200/year for 2 phones), and paid $15/month for a small data plan for internet (just so my husband could check his Etsy sales.) We ended up saving about $100/month and we felt so free from that constant internet pull.

Joy: In Alaska you can get on a roadkill list. The state troopers call you when a moose gets hit and you can claim it if it’s your turn.

Marcie: I’ve moved several times and I think paying for new boxes is absurd. I drive behind strip malls and dumpster dive for boxes. They even have dumpsters for cardboard only, so no ick factor!

Randall: I worked on the crew that built a huge log cabin for a client. He only used it in the Winter. He couldn’t, and didn’t want to shovel the snow off the wraparound deck we built around his house. None of the neighbors that lived nearby would do it either, so I took on the task. Turned out it was quite relaxing. Put on headphones and shovel. We had an arrangement based on how many inches of snow. From November to March I would bring in between $200 to $400 a month.

Patricia: I work two jobs, and after the office parties I always volunteer to stay and clean up. People think I’m so nice, but in reality, I’m packaging up the leftover food to take home. My weekend job is security at a banquet hall, and after the weddings and such, the chef always says to “take whatever you want, we’re only going to toss it.” Many times I get a week’s worth of high end food already cooked. I take what I can carry, and freeze what I can’t.

Korina: When I was about 16, my dad saw a mobile phone in the middle of a busy crossroad, so he stopped and picked it up. We had no way of identifying who it belonged to (busy tourist spot, no info in the phone.) It looked like someone probably left it on the top of their car and it fell off when they turned. We got a prepaid sim card . . . and lil’ teenager me had my first mobile phone!

Nicole:  The garbage in my apartment complex had a large snapware container in it with some moldy muffins. It was on top of some stuff toward the bottom of a fairly clean bin. So, before dumping my stuff, I reached my whole self in so I could grab the container (like the size of a casserole, so I know it was expensive new.) I opened it and dumped out the moldy muffins in the food/yard waste bin, and then cleaned the container at home.

Catherine: My bathroom walls (floor to ceiling) have unique tile designs composed of the cheapest plain square white tiles interspersed with compositions of broken china, some accidentally smashed at home, some bought at thrift stores or auctions, or from a high end antique store that scorns to sell chipped china. (But you can scavenge their discard box in the basement if you ask nicely.)

Najia: I fed my family and numerous other families (all military) from the thrown away food at the commissary for months. I actually started an unofficial food bank from their incredible wastefulness.

Cat: I am a traveling RN and plan my grocery, gasoline, and other stops around where I’m seeing patients. Once home, I rarely leave unless absolutely necessary.

Cindy: Didn’t have a washing machine when we were first married. Did all laundry, including diapers, by hand in the bathtub.

Conclusion:

Whether you find inspiration from frugal folk who save their bath water or those who dumpster dive for still usable items, these ideas are still a thousand times more useful than yet another barista-themed frugality article. You may not be ready to seek out your state’s “roadkill list,” but you can certainly set aside your “ick factor” and scavenge a perfectly good snapware dish or a freezer full of delicious wedding leftovers. I know I’m freshly inspired to find new ways to work frugality into my daily routine.

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

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{ 66 comments }

Striking Gold at Goodwill

by Katy on March 21, 2017 · 9 comments

The following is a previously published post. Enjoy!

My sister and her family are in town right now, which of course necessitated a trip to Goodwill. I did my usual sweep through the store, and then just followed my sister around, chatting and glancing down at the shelves. And then suddenly, there it was. Shining its golden surface up at me like a forgotten bottle of whiskey floating in Charlie Sheen’s toilet tank.

The bottom half of a Swiss Gold reusable coffee filter.

Let me start from the beginning. My husband is a coffee drinker, and has been using the same Swiss Gold coffee filter over the past ten years or so. These 23 Karat gold individual filters normally cost $19, so it was a big decision to buy one at the time. We’ve been hesitant to buy another one, so subsequently we baby the one we have. Unfortunately, daily use has taken its toll, and the coffee is not as beautifully filtered as it once was. And ironically, I was just waxing poetic about how I once found one a garage sale for 50¢, which I then gave to my father.

And here’s the best part. I only needed the bottom piece to the filter, and that’s exactly what was sitting on the Goodwill shelf.

I love Goodwill, and I will try to remember this purchase, as I try to hold back from going too often in an attempt to avoid recluttering my house. Such a perfect purchase! Not clutter at all!

Ahh . . . .

 

Hello, lover.

Can you tell which filter is the new one?

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

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{ 9 comments }

I Tested These Four Cleaning Hacks!

by Katy on March 20, 2017 · 35 comments

This blog post originally appeared over at ClarkHoward.com.

What is it about the word “hack” that elevates a mundane chore into something more fun? Is it because a hack implies a clever solution to an otherwise frustrating household dilemma? Whatever it is, I love a good hack and I know that I’m not alone. Especially when those hacks require zero extra purchases and require nothing more than my frugal supplies already on hand.

However, a lot of these supposed miraculous internet hacks are a bust, so I went through the trouble of testing four of them to save Clark Howard readers from wasting your precious time and energy.

Hack #1: Squeegee on carpet.

This hack has legions of fans who love how the lowly squeegee easily removes pet hair from hard to clean carpeted stairs. For this test, I borrowed my neighbor’s cat friendly stairs, as my own are wood. I doubted whether there’d be anything to clean, as my neighbor’s house appears immaculate at all times. Lo and behold, I was rewarded with a satisfying amount of cat hair after just a few swipes with my $1 Dollar Tree squeegee.

Hack #1 — thumbs up!

Hack #2: Polish silver with boiling water, baking soda and aluminum foil.

This hack promises to polish silver without the work of scrubbing, and it’s actually been in my rotation for a number of years. I love my old silverware, but I hate, hate, hate the work of polishing it. (Hand cramps.) My mother has informed me that this method is incorrect, as it temporarily removes the dark details, but I still rebelliously dip my silver into this magical elixir.

Instructions: Line a pan with aluminum foil, add in a couple tablespoons of baking soda and boiling water almost to the top. Dip your silver into the solution and watch the tarnish magically disappear. Pro tip: Use tongs, as the silver quickly gets very hot.

Hack #2 –Thumbs up! (Sorry, mom.)

Hack #3: Use an extra stretchy sock for your Swiffer Sweeper.

I love the convenience of a Swiffer to clean my 104-year-old hardwood floors, but I hate spending money on expensive and wasteful disposable cloths. Enter an extra stretchy sock to the rescue! I have a couple pairs of these puffy socks, which are extremely stretchy and work perfectly for this function. I simply dampen the sock, and then swiff and sweep to my heart’s content. I then switch it out with a new sock to dry any wet areas. The best part is that the sock has enough texture for actual cleaning, plus they’re washable for reuse.

Hack #3 — Thumbs up!

Hack #4: Clean your oven door using vinegar and baking soda.

It seems like however much I clean it, the inside of my oven door reverts to being a baked on mess. I’d seen online tips for sprinkling the door with baking soda and then spraying with vinegar as an eco-friendly cleaning hack. This method sounded easy, so I happily gave it a try. Unfortunately, this hack was a bust. Yes, I was able to get a decent before-and-after photo, but it was only with a tremendous amount of back breaking scrubbing and elbow grease. This was far from being any type of clever solution. Seriously, it took forever.

Hack #4 — Thumbs down!

Conclusion:

Although the fourth hack got a resounding thumbs down in my book, it was still worth a try. I want to work smarter not harder when it comes to maintaining my home and its contents, and without a bit of experimentation I’d never have discovered how well the other three hacks worked. And nothing makes me feel smarter than finding clever solutions to life’s little problems.

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

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Five Frugal Things

by Katy on March 19, 2017 · 85 comments

  1. My mother and I spent an afternoon going to Goodwills, including one that was selling this large-for-a-toy-but-small-for-a-human Clone Trooper. Needless to say, I couldn’t resist having a bit of fun with it before putting it back on the shelf. We also stopped into a pay-by-the-pound Goodwill Outlet where I bought a hand embroidered pillow, a nice thick potholder, a Led Zeppelin T-shirt, a laser cut Star Wars clock up-cycled from an old record and some greeting card and vintage paper napkins for my mother. Total cost? $4.97. Guess which items are for my son’s upcoming 19th birthday?
  2. I wrote five Clark Howard articles this week, I worked two hospital shifts, I helped my mother clean one of her guest cottages and I gave away multiple items through my Buy Nothing Group.
  3. I binge watched The Kindness Diaries on Netflix. A great project from Leon Logothetis chronicling his around the world journey to rely solely on the kindness of strangers. Very much a message about non-consumerism, and I highly recommend for readers of this blog.
  4. I drove my mother through a Wendy’s restaurant, and treated her to a free Frosty Jr. using my $1 Frosty key tag that supports the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption. (You buy the key tag once for $1 and then get a year of Frosty Jr.’s for free.)
  5. I didn’t buy a Lear Jet or a vulgar gold-plated apartment in the sky.

Now your turn. What frugal things have you been up to?

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

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{ 85 comments }

This blog post first appeared over at ClarkHoward.com.

You’re a fan of Clark Howard, which means that you’re thoughtful and deliberate with your spending. In short, you’re “Clark Smart.” You think twice before spending your hard earned money, and when your social media feed suddenly fills up with people posting about how Nordstrom is selling a pair of $95 TopShop “Clear Knee Mom Jeans,” you think “that must be a joke!”

But they’re no joke.

Here’s the description: “Slick plastic panels bare your knees for a futuristic feel in tapered and cropped high-waist jeans.” Yes, you read that right. The future now includes plastic encased knees, plus a high waist to create the perfect “mom jeans” aesthetic.

Of course, the internet exploded with incredulous responses. Buzzfeed, quickly termed them “jindows,” (jeans + windows) and reported that they were “dividing the nation.” And Buffy The Vampire Slayer’s Tommy Lenk, (famous for recreating celebrity looks from household detritus) added this photo to his Instagram feed. and shared that his “knees were dripping with sweat after two minutes.”

Those of us old enough to remember the 1981 Ryan O’Neal film So Fine recognize the look. Of course, that film is described as a “satirical romp,” and should in no way be inspiring any real life fashion trends.

Perhaps the look is prompted by people complaining of shiveringly wet knees after wearing TopShops’s “Hayden Ripped Boyfriend Jeans.” After all, they’re a British fashion house, and what is England known for besides rain?

Look, brr . . .

Luckily, you’re too smart to be tempted by this bizarre (and hopefully brief) style trend. You follow Will Roger’s famous quote that “The quickest way to double your money is to fold it in half and put it in your back pocket”

That is, if your jeans still include a back pocket.

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

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{ 26 comments }

Five Frugal Things

by Katy on March 15, 2017 · 61 comments

  1. I went for a walk with my friend Lise yesterday. We dropped off plastics recycling, deposited checks at our credit union, returned library materials and then stopped into Fred Meyer, where I bought bananas and two loaves of 79¢ clearance-priced bread. I didn’t use Pi Day (3/14) as an excuse to buy a $3.14 apple pie, as 1) I don’t understand what “Pi” really is, and 2) I’m better off without a gross but delicious grocery store pie.
  2. I ran my hand under the coin counting machine at the credit union and was rewarded with four quarters, one nickel and a single penny. I added this money to my Found Change Challenge jar.
  3. I put together two quick offers for my Buy Nothing Group. I now have people in a hippity-hoppity mood to come over to pick up boxes of leftover sparklers and four packets of matcha green tea powder that I received as gifts. Slightly less clutter in my kitchen and I put already manufactured goods into the hands of people who will use them, I call that a win!
  4. I wrote and submitted two new articles for Clark Howard yesterday. The next tuition/room/board payment is looming large, (April 1st) so I’m taking full advantage of any and all income opportunities. I’m puttering around the house today to get ready for house guests, but hope to put together at least one more article.
  5. I didn’t buy a Lear Jet or a vulgar gold-plated apartment in the sky.

Now your turn. What frugal things have you been up to?

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

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