Five Frugal Things

by Katy on August 18, 2016 · 84 comments

 Seasoning salt

1. I was annoyed with how enormous the pour holes were on my bottle of Dollar Tree seasoning salt, so I covered four of the holes with electrical tape. Now I can enjoy my eggs without feeling like a deer at a salt lick. Or conversely, like that kid from the original Star Trek who killed people for their salt. Remember him? So sad without his salt.

Edit: This is not the salt sucking Star Trek creature. I am deeply ashamed to be outed as not knowing the original Star Trek inside and out. Please forgive me.

Salt kid from Star Trek

2.  I went to Fred Meyer (Kroger) last night, but actually took the time to load e-coupons onto my card before leaving the house. Just a couple bucks of savings, but every penny counts. Right?

3.  My mother brought me a large bag of plums that her friend had given her for free. I immediately put them into the fridge since we have fruit flies. #PlumTart

4.  My sister and her kids are flying in from New York City tonight, and will stay with us for a couple of weeks. I’ll only work one shift while she’s here which I only have the luxury to do because I am so frugal the rest of the year. (I’m in an on-call position, which means I get no sick or vacation pay.)

5.  We’re heading into a heat wave, and our second floor gets pretty hot after a couple days of high temperatures. We don’t have central air conditioning, so I was feeling bad for my nephew who will be sharing a room with my younger son. (Note that I don’t feel bad for my son, as he’s survived 18 summers in his room with nothing more than a window fan.) My mother had offered a window air conditioner from a room she no longer uses. Instead, she remembered that she actually had a brand new air conditioner that had never been installed. My husband and I drove over, picked it up and installed it that night. Now my son and his cousin will have a nice comfortable room for sleeping and hanging out.

Now your turn. What frugal things have you been up to?

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Twitter.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Instagram.
Click HERE to join The Non-Consumer Advocate Facebook group.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Pinterest.

{ 84 comments }

The post first appeared over at Clark Howard.com.

Unless you live off grid without the influence of media, your children are likely to have favorite characters that steer their wants and needs. Be it Disney’s Frozen, Star Wars or Cars, there are endless products emblazoned with these characters. You can easily spend thousands of dollars indulging these purchases, because what’s cuter than a $299 Cars bed or even this $3999 Millennium Falcon version? Add in the bedding, pillows, posters, backpacks, lighting, wastebaskets, rugs and artwork, and you’ve invested a ton of money in this theme.

Instead I recommend that you choose attractive but neutral stuff for your kids that will outlast each new whim. You can certainly add in a few accessories to complement their current interest. Pillows, posters and a couple of stuffed animals won’t set you back much, plus they’re much easier to change out when your kids’ interests naturally evolve.

I spoke to one mom who chose a neutral high quality backpack for her kindergarten age son, and then added a “Herbie The Love Bug” patch for customization. As his interests expanded, she would pick out the stitches and sew on a new one, and by fifth grade her son’s five-year-old backpack featured a “Beatles” patch. She explained that “I doubt he would have wanted to carry a Cars themed backpack as an eleven year old, and I doubt a character backpack would have held up anyway.”

One tip is to only buy character items that a child would naturally grows out of, like T-shirts, pajamas and shoes. So go right ahead and buy that Frozen T-shirt for your four year old, but forgo the coordinating comforter, lamp and iPhone case that’s sure to embarrass your daughter come middle school.

But what happens when your child hits puberty and ages out of their former obsession, and their formerly adored rooms are suddenly deemed as “babyish?” You’ve spent a bundle crafting a theme to their each and every possession which is now more embarrassing than dad’s incessant knock-knock jokes. Worry not, as there are a number of solutions.

Donate to your favorite charity

Whether you’re a fan of Goodwill, Salvation Army or a local non-profit, you can always donate outgrown stuff for a tax deduction. This Salvation Army value guide clarifies the amount you can legally deduct from your taxes, so make sure to write a detailed list of every donated item for a maximum deduction.

Sell on eBay or Craigslist 

Selling on eBay and Craigslist has never been easier, especially now that most of us have a camera and internet access built into our mobile devices. Create good pictures, take measurements and accurately describe each item and you might be able to get at least get some of your money back.

Give it the slip

Slip that Princess or Star Wars comforter into a duvet cover like one of these inexpensive Ikea versions. That’s what I did when my now 18-year-old son outgrew his love for Teletubbies, and to further bring down the price, I even picked it up at my local Goodwill.

The great cover up

Decoupage over childish themes using Mod-Podge. Here’s a Miss Spider’s Tea Party wastebasket which I updated by covering with vintage maps. This transformation not only got my son through his teen year wastebasket needs, but it also accompanied him to college. (This may seem inconsequential, but recent studies suggest that the average college student is spending $899.18 to outfit their dorm rooms. Add that on top of room, board and tuition, and suddenly that wastebasket from home sounds like a great idea!)

Conclusion

By choosing to not spend excessively on stuff that needs to be repurchased every few years, you’re able to keep your money available for the things that really matter. Although it’s tempting to indulge your kids’ every whim, you lead by example when teach that possessions are not disposable, and that smart people spend wisely.

This singular choice will save you hundreds, possibly thousands of dollars throughout your son or daughter’s childhood.

Now, if we could only figure out a way to update dad’s knock-knock jokes!

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Twitter.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Instagram.
Click HERE to join The Non-Consumer Advocate Facebook group.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Pinterest.

{ 23 comments }

The following is a reprint of a previously published post. Enjoy!

Do a web search for green cleaning products, and you’ll find a bajillion results, ranging from expensive store bought products to a myriad of feel good homemade concoctions. Heck, I’ve even been known to post a recipe or two on this very blog. But really, the greenest cleaning methods have always been and will always be elbow grease. That’s right, fellow non-consumers, put your back in it, work up a sweat and git scrubbin’. The scientists behind toxic automatic shower cleaning sprayers and toilet cleaning tabs are selling you on the idea of a clean house without actual muscular effort. But unless you have physical limitations that bar your scrubbing power, chemicals that melt soap scum and water spots do you (and your, ahem . . . planet) a disservice.

I have a vintage bun warmer pan that I bought at Goodwill in 1990 or 91. It is the perfect pan for cooking pasta, because it weighs next to nothing and has a swivel top that allows for a small amount of steam to escape, thus avoiding the inevitable boil-over. I think I payed a buck or two. However, I recently burned the crap out of this pan, and was considering it a complete loss. I was even keeping an eye out at Goodwill for a replacement, when I remembered that my sister Jessica had given me a box of soapy steel wool pads for Christmas. (She knows me so well.)

So I rolled up my sleeves up and got my scrub on.

The burnt crud came off pretty easily. Not so easily that there was no satisfaction in the job, (what fun would that be?) and I was suddenly filled with childhood memories of my father scrubbing pots and pans to their very shiniest and showing them off to my sister and I, who were about as interested as toddlers at a meditation retreat. Luckily, my father swung by yesterday afternoon, and was appropriately impressed with my scrubbing prowess.

And yeah, my elbows are buttery soft. Thanks for asking.

Before:

 

 

After:

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Twitter.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Instagram.
Click HERE to join The Non-Consumer Advocate Facebook group.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Pinterest.

{ 33 comments }

Five Frugal Things

by Katy on August 10, 2016 · 101 comments

  1. I hung a load of laundry in the backyard this morning. The last couple of days have been rainy, so it’s nice to crank up the solar clothes dryer again.
  2. I’m planning a dinner that’ll be concocted using stuff from the fridge and pantry. Even though I’d rather get burritos from the amazing Mexican food cart that’s three blocks from the house.
  3. My father treated me to lunch yesterday, which was doubly enjoyable since I ran into an old friend that I hadn’t seen for years and years.
  4. I bought another Goodwill doll for resale. So far she hasn’t generated any interest, but I only paid $6.99, so I can list her for less and still make a profit.
  5. I work both Friday and Saturday, I’m working on another Clark Howard article, I relisted a Craigslist listing, I found a penny on the ground at Fred Meyer and I redistributed some potting soil from a free flowerpot.

Now your turn. What frugal things have you been up to?

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Twitter.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Instagram.
Click HERE to join The Non-Consumer Advocate Facebook group.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Pinterest.

{ 101 comments }

Five Frugal Things

by Katy on August 9, 2016 · 92 comments

Jake's

  1. My husband taught a CPR class on Saturday and brought home two pourable boxes of Starbucks coffee. I stuck them in the fridge and we’ve been enjoying them for iced coffee ever since.
  2. Yesterday was our anniversary, so my husband and I dressed up just a tiny bit and drove downtown to enjoy the bar menu at Jake’s Famous Crawfish. The bill came to $33, which included drinks, entrees, an appetizer and a tip. Not too shabby! To truly appreciate what a bargain this was, you should check out the prices on their normal menu!
  3. I took my still sick son to the doctor yesterday, but realized halfway home that she’d forgotten to give him the medical note that he needed for work. Instead of driving back, my husband and I walked to the office to pick up the note and enjoy the nice cool weather. We’d planned on doing some kind of activity during the day, so this had to suffice. Luckily, the walk which included stops at the library and the pharmacy was perfectly enjoyable.
  4. My son requested my white bean rosemary soup, so I put some Dollar Tree navy beans into the crock pot for tonight’s dinner. This soup is so delicious and costs less than two bucks for a huge amount!
  5. I didn’t buy a Lear Jet.

Now your turn. What frugal things have you been up to?

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Twitter.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Instagram.
Click HERE to join The Non-Consumer Advocate Facebook group.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Pinterest.

{ 92 comments }

The following post was first published over at Clark Howard.com.

Garage sale season is upon us, which can mean either, A) Time to get rid of the excess within your home, or B) Time to take advantage of all the amazing deals you can score from other people’s garage sales. Unlike a thrift store whose goal is to make as much money as possible to support their non-profit mission, garage sales are put on by people who are simply looking to get rid of their often brand new stuff, even if that means taking a huge loss.

But their loss is your gain, because garages sales are a great opportunity to buy a much higher quality item than you could normally afford. Because why shop at Wal-Mart, Ikea or Target for a frankly low quality item when you can spend less for an expensive brand designed to last throughout the years?

Here’s what to keep an eye out for:

Furniture

Having next to no budget for furniture doesn’t mean you’re destined to buy particle board and veneer placeholders. Garage sales offer the opportunity to pick up high quality furniture that can be handed down through multiple generations.

Dressers with dovetail joints. You can be sure that manufacturers who took this extra step have created a quality product. Often an vintage piece, an older dresser can be a classic style that’s not teetering on the edge of outdatedness.

Solid wood furniture. If you’re handy with a paint brush, you can transform bland or unfashionable furniture into beautiful pieces that are sure to last.

Quality upholstered furniture is likely to be heavier than your average big box example, so lift up that armchair for a quick clue as to the product’s quality.

Check the joints. If you see that the piece was assembled using an allen-wrench then leave it behind, as it’s unlikely to be a piece manufactured with longevity in mind.

Pots and pans

If you’re tired of shelling out big bucks on new pans every couple of years, garage sales are the place to go.

Cast iron pans. Many people shy away from cast iron, thinking it’s too fussy or doesn’t work with a glass top stove. (Not true, as countless people use cast iron on their glass cooktops without issue.) Certain brands such as Griswold and Wagner can even be worth hundreds of dollars, plus a cast iron pan will last until you no longer have the Thor-like strength to heft its’ mighty weight.

Enameled cast iron. With prices up to $300, quality brands such as Le Creuset would normally throw off your budget, but a garage sale alternative will often let you buy one of these workhorses for just a couple of bucks.

Stainless steel. Pricey brands such as Cuisinart or All-Clad are another quality pan to keep an eye out for when garage sale-ing. Without that pesky non-stick surface, there’s no coating to ruin. Buy quality, buy once.

Clothing

A lot of trendy fast fashion is designed to be worn just a single season, with zero thought for the longevity of the piece. However, you can know that a garage sale garment that’s already been through a previous owner is unlikely to fall apart after a few washings. This goes for clothing, as well as outerwear and footwear. Know your brands and you can add timeless pieces to last through the years.

Tools

Tools. It’s not an uncommon occurrence for a garage sale to feature a table littered with dusty rusty tools, but don’t make the mistake of assuming that old means worthless. Older tools are more likely to be manufactured with quality in mind, and you can be sure that a monkey wrench that’s old enough to drink is likely to last another couple more decades.

Toys and baby stuff

Baby supplies. Parents all know that babies outgrow their supplies long before anything can possibly wear out, and since those parents are desperate to get rid of kid clutter, this area of bargain hunting is rich with treasure. Pay pennies instead of dollars for your baby’s needs, and you might just have a chance of setting money aside for college.

Pricey Euro-style toys. If you’re the type that leans towards Waldorf-style wooden or educational toys, you’re already aware of the sticker shock from $83 sets of blocks. Luckily you don’t have to be a Rockefeller to buy quality toys when shopping at garage sales. Browse garage sales in higher income neighborhoods, and you’ll be surprised what you can find.

Whether you’re needing baby supplies or fresh toys for the kiddos, garage sales can save you a bundle. Just make sure to glance through the Consumer Product Safety Commission website for recent recalls before heading out.

Conclusion

Garage sales are an amazing opportunity to buy the level of stuff that’s normally only available to wealthy big spenders. Choose this route and you can outfit your home with timeless items that don’t suffer from planned (or even perceived) obsolescence. You’ll be on budget, with style.

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Twitter.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Instagram.
Click HERE to join The Non-Consumer Advocate Facebook group.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Pinterest.

{ 14 comments }

Five Frugal Things

by Katy on August 7, 2016 · 75 comments

  1. A co-worker brought in two huge bags of plums on Friday. I brought home a small bag for eating, but talked to her about buying a larger amount for making plum jam.
  2. I’m not working very much this due to a number of reasons, but I’ll make up for it in September, as it’ll be another five paycheck month. (Three for my husband, two for me) Less will go into savings this month, but we’ll be fine.
  3. My older son has been sick all week, and worsened yesterday. Of course, it happened on a Saturday. I brought him to a local private urgent care center instead of an emergency room. Not only were we seen almost immediately, but our out of pocket expense was only $47 which included a variety of different lab tests. I was pleased until I remembered that I’d forgotten to use our HSA card.
  4. Tomorrow is our 23rd anniversary, so my husband and I are planning to dine at a local fancy-schmancy restaurant. However, we’ll sit in the bar and enjoy food from the happy hour menu. This exactly what we did the evening after our wedding. Great food, but nice and simple. Plus of course, frugal.
  5. I didn’t buy a Lear Jet.

Now your turn. What frugal things have you been up to?

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Twitter.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Instagram.
Click HERE to join The Non-Consumer Advocate Facebook group.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Pinterest.

{ 75 comments }

This blog post first appeared over at ClarkHoward.com.

If you wanted to research how to save money on your electronics, you’d likely be pointed in the direction of where to buy cheap! and on sale. Never even addressing the possibility that making do with what you already own or scooping up a deal on what others would consider to be out of date are perfectly acceptable options. It turns out that there are amazing opportunities to save big bucks when you bypass the latest and greatest technology!

Televisions

It’s a recent assumption that televisions need to be as thin as a saltine cracker. Look back a decade, and television depths were measured with yard sticks not millimeters. However, many of those TV’s were flat screen with high definition and excellent picture quality, and frankly they lasted longer than today’s plasma-whatever version. My household boasts two humorously thick TV sets that offer perfect screen quality and came to us free via upgrading friends, who have since confessed regret, as their new TV’s have provided inferior picture quality. So unless you live in a Manhattan micro-apartment and have to justify every square centimeter of your living space, open your mind (and your square footage) to a thicker television.

Kitchen appliances

Watch even thirty seconds of any HGTV House Hunters show, and you’d be right to assume that many Americans would rather eat dirt than prepare food in a kitchen not outfitted with stainless steel appliances. However, if you’re willing to consider, gasp . . . white appliances you could save yourself hundreds if not thousands of dollars. Why? Because people rip out their perfectly functional, often high end kitchen appliances to replace them with their shiny metal counterparts. Keep an eye out on Craigslist, and you can even scoop these up for free. Yes, it has been shown that “homes with stainless-steel appliances sell 15% faster than average homes,” but until you’re on the verge of putting your house on the market, you can probably suffer through the indignity of a classic white stove. Especially if you got it for free.

Video game systems

Video game manufacturers would have you believe that you’re a cave dwelling luddite if you don’t upgrade your video game system every couple of years. So, unless you’re an elite professional gamer, (seriously, that’s a thing!) you can continue using your older game system. And if you put the word out, you can even pick up games for pennies on the dollar. Games that are still fun to play, games that won’t rob you of your financial security. And if you’re self conscious about not having the latest Mortal Combat or Guitar Hero, just label yourself “retro” and embrace the old school lifestyle. After all, people are already going bonkers for a mini Nintendo NES that’s not even scheduled to be released until November. Priced at $59.99, it turns out that out of date will eventually be repackaged as cool and retro!

Mini NES

 

Clothesline

You may harbor a negative view of clotheslines, but they’re making a resurgence right here in the U.S., with dozens of states passing “Right to Dry” laws that guarantee citizens the right to install personal clotheslines. The simplest of technologies, (can you even call rope “technology?”) clotheslines save both money and energy, not to mention wear and tear on your dryer. I use my backyard clothesline throughout the summer here in Oregon, which always causes my electric bill to go down by at least 25%. You may think that you’re not allowed a clothesline due to home owner association rules, but if your state has a Right to Dry law in the books, you have the freedom to dry your clothes in the sun and wind. After all, there’s nothing more luxurious and delicious smelling than line-dried sheets!

Cell phones

If you’re the type to upgrade your cell phone with each new technology rollout, you might want to rethink this practice. Believe it or not, phones can and do last longer than a year, as well they should when you take into account the environmental impact of all that serial upgrading. And don’t even think about financing that brand new phone! Not only does a carrier financed phone tie you to that company, but you almost need a PhD in finance to understand the terms. This Life Hacker piece dumbed it down, but still called it “convoluted” and advises you to “take a hard look at the fine print.”

If you have your heart set on a new cell phone, you’d be smart to consider last year’s “new” version, as spendy types will have dumped theirs faster than a lead footed Nascar driver. Instead purchase an older unlocked version through a friend or eBay, and then bring it to your carrier for activation. Hey, hold onto your old phone long enough and it might even be worth some serious moolah!

Push mower

Revving up your gas lawn mower might be part of your weekend routine, but imagine how pleasant that chore would be without all the noise and exhaust. Add in a healthy bit of exercise and you’re describing a push mower. You know, the kind used by hippies and healthy elderly people. Sure, they’re not practical if you’re mowing 40 acres, but admit it, you’ve probably got a suburban lawn that’s well within your ability. Without a motor, there’s nothing to maintain and no gas to buy. Maybe sharpen the blades every so often and you’re set for the season! Save money at the purchase, on maintenance and supplies, and you might even save money on a gym membership!

Conclusion

We’re all trained to believe that our role as consumers is to keep up with the Joneses and all their shiny pretty stuff. If you make a conscious decision to say “no” to perceived obsolescence, you can keep more of your dollars in your wallet, which is where they belong. Because yes, it turns out that a year old phone does still work!

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Twitter.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Instagram.
Click HERE to join The Non-Consumer Advocate Facebook group.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Pinterest.

{ 36 comments }

Five Frugal Things

by Katy on August 4, 2016 · 58 comments

Financial aid award!

  1. I stopped on my way home from dropping my son at work to pick up a few things at the QFC grocery store, and was able to score a few “woo-hoo” clearance items. I’d been there the day before and had the same luck, so I think I may add this store into my rotation. Especially since I scored two huge bags of mushrooms yesterday for 99¢ apiece. I don’t normally go to this expensive store, because . . .  money. I’m thinking that perhaps their higher end customer isn’t as excited as I am about discounted food, which can only work in my favor.
  2. My husband is continuing to work on fixing our son’s iPhone. He successfully fixed the charging port . . . but now the forward facing camera doesn’t work. He’s figuring out getting an old phone for parts and will soon construct a Frankenphone to keep us (and our debit card) far from the Apple Store.
  3. I enjoyed a lovely chat with my neighbor on my front porch this afternoon. She complimented me on the arrangement, and especially enjoyed how everything was either dragged home from someone’s curb and gleaned from Goodwill. She brought me a pretty flower arrangement as a thank you gift for watching her cats, and a lovely time was had by all.
  4. I received an e-mail notifying me that my son’s college financial aid had been updated. I excitedly logged into the website and discovered that the “update” was that we’ve officially declined the massive student loans. (Note the $18,000+ “Parent Plus” loan suggested for us!) I had to laugh at that! I guess my husband and I need to keep our jobs, continue buying discount mushrooms and scouring our local Goodwills! (Worry not, both of our sons have jobs.)
  5. I didn’t buy a Lear Jet.

Now your turn. What frugal things have you been up to?

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Twitter.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Instagram.
Click HERE to join The Non-Consumer Advocate Facebook group.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Pinterest.

{ 58 comments }

Develop a Minor Expertise

by Katy on August 4, 2016 · 21 comments

Podcasts

I like listening to podcasts when going about the somewhat dull tasks of my day. Cleaning, hanging laundry, commuting and running errands. It can add up to a couple of hours per day, which gives me the opportunity to find inspiration on financial matters, decor, blogging, habits and happiness.

One of my favorite podcasts is Happier with Gretchen Rubin which includes her delightfully droll sister, Elizabeth Craft.

A recent episode included a segment encouraging listeners to “develop a minor expertise.” This advice made me realize that I already engage in this act as a natural component of my reselling side-gig. Whether it’s dolls, midcentury and antique furniture, antique marbles, barkcloth fabric, Birkenstocks, vintage Pyrex, cast iron or any of the other endless categories that I’ve researched to optimally sell my thrifted finds.

To many, researching these categories would be burdensome and a barrier to taking advantage of this lucrative income opportunity. To me, the process of developing a minor expertise is not only a necessity, but a delightfully enjoyable perk of the transaction. Checking “completed listings” on eBay, finding specialty groups on Facebook and allowing myself to indulge in luxurious in-depth internet searches to increase my knowledge on the detailed history of my scores. It’s fun, plus I thoroughly enjoy getting to add to my knowledge base.

Not only am I educating myself about my Goodwill finds, but I’m also honing my eye on what to keep an eye out for on future thrifting excursions. That way I’ll know that diamond in the rough when I see it.

I’m sure that I walk past great items every time I enter a thrift store, but since it’s stuff that I know nothing about, it doesn’t even catch my eye. With every new category of purchase, I increase my knowledge a little bit more, which then increases my chances of later spying that million dollar item. (Don’t laugh, this happens! Sure, it’s been for other people so far, but a girl can dream.)

Would you enjoy developing a minor expertise? Do you think this act would boost your happiness? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below.

Katy Wolk-Stanley

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”

Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Twitter.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Instagram.
Click HERE to join The Non-Consumer Advocate Facebook group.
Click HERE to follow The Non-Consumer Advocate on Pinterest.

{ 21 comments }